Digg was all about news and nothing else. It didn’t work out.

Couple days ago, I was having lunch with a friend who used to work at Twitter. Eventually, the issue of Fake News came up. I told him, as more of a joke, that Facebook could just solve the Fake News problem by taking the News out of News Feed, and turning it to essentially just a bunch of social update. He retorted, saying that product already existed and it was called Instagram. We both sighed and shrugged and downed a few more drinks.

Now, apparently Facebook is trying that exactly, and of course publishers are freaking out. You can’t really blame them. For many publishers, Facebook is their biggest source of traffic, which they monetize via ads. But you can also not just feel bad for them, because, that is the risk of building your business on someone else’s platform. Just ask Zynga.

My understanding is that Facebook started promoting news sources and publishers more or less as a defense mechanism against Twitter. It might be ancient history now, but there was a time where the fates of these companies weren’t as far apart as they are now. Facebook noticed that Twitter was getting an undue amount of attention from the media folks, with newscasters and individual journalists signing up on in droves and moving the conversation there. Facebook wasn’t a fan, decided to flex its muscles a bit.

I don’t know if that’s true, but it rings true. And I know this, because I used to work at a company that was in the same boat, at the same time. When we launched Digg V4, one if its goals was to cut down the noise of Twitter and just focus on links instead of the mundane status updates. It didn’t work out, and Digg imploded rather spectacularly but the idea was solid. Digg was always at the forefront of many ideas that are common now, such as “liking” things both in and out of Digg’s website and apps. But with Digg V4, it all came crushing down.

To understand all this, you need to go back to 2010, if not earlier. Twitter and Digg were both merely curiosities, largely unknown outside of Silicon Valley. Twitter However, Digg controlled a significant amount of traffic, and getting on its front page could be a huge boost to not just publishers but really any company. Even Dropbox, now a pretty much a household name, attributed a significant amount of their early users to getting on Digg’s front page.

However, Twitter was already gaining momentum. Although the site could barely stand without failwhaling, it was already signing up big time users like Ashton Kutcher, Justin Bieber. But they didn’t really drive traffic to anyone; and most people were using it as a more public stream of consciousness than anything.

So that was one of Digg’s plays with V4; that we’d be the driver of traffic to publishers because we didn’t have any of those pesky “I am eating a cheese sandwich” updates that littered your Twitter timeline that you didn’t know what to do with.

Kevin Rose tweet about Digg V4
Kevin Rose tweet about Digg V4

The why and the how of Digg’s failure is complicated. But largely, it was a perfect storm of technical issues (mostly of our own doing), management mishaps, and of course the Cold War Digg used to wage on its users finally erupting into thermonuclear skirmishes. Digg always had a delicate relationship with its most influential user base; either side never really blinked but with Digg V4,  it all changed.

One of the most controversial changes was making My News, the logged in personalized page the default option, as opposed to the “Top News”, which was The Digg Homepage. With this change, the importance of Top News was significantly reduced since we essentially distributed the logged in page views across thousands of personalized homepages. This was both a way to keep more people logged in, by providing them a better and more engaging homepage, but also to make sure that we had more unique pages where most publishers could get clicks from.

The real controversial change was actually allowing publishers to automatically submit items to Digg by sucking in their RSS feeds. What this meant is that now you could participate in Digg without really participating; we could just suggest your account to new users who would see your content, which Digg would automatically ingest, without you doing ever anything. And the fact that we accidentally, I swear, promoted those items over manually submitted items did not help.

While Digg made a conscious decision to prioritize big publishers, we managed to scare away most of the user base. Without users, of course, the traffic publishers received started dwindling down. But more critically, without eyeballs on Digg itself, the advertisers slowly fled. The rest is history.

Facebook, for what’s its worth, never had a problem with users leaving its service and I doubt they ever will. I don’t know if they would, but they could remove all the links to publishers from News Feed and most users wouldn’t give a damn. The genius of News Feed was never the links, but it was the ability to give living and breathing person on earth their own personalized rumor mill. The outrage articles, especially in the age of Trump is addictive, for sure, but it doesn’t hold a candle to the addictiveness of being able to see a new update from one of your friends.

I am a strong believer in the importance of journalism for a liberal democracy. I would dare not wish for publishers, and journalists to lose their sources of revenue. But at the same time, I can’t imagine that at least the big publishers did not see this coming. No one in their right mind would put all their eggs in someone’s basket. And hey, maybe this is a good thing. Maybe this is the wake up call we all needed.

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